MIDI instrument for oboe d'amore

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MIDI instrument for oboe d'amore

Jacques Menu Muzhic
Hello,

I find oboe and french horn, but no oboe d’amore in A.6 MIDI instruments.

Which other setting can I use for this instrument in A? There’s no clarinet in A either.

Thanks for your help!

JM


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Re: MIDI instrument for oboe d'amore

Lukas-Fabian Moser
Hi Jacques,

> I find oboe and french horn, but no oboe d’amore in A.6 MIDI instruments.
>
> Which other setting can I use for this instrument in A? There’s no clarinet in A either.

To be honest, I fail to see the relation between the transposition of an
instrument and the MIDI instruments to be used for it.

Of course, an Oboe d'amore has a unique sound distinct from the oboe
(and the English Horn/Cor anglais, for that matter - I'm not sure what
you mean by mentioning the french horn in this context?), but of all the
standard midi instruments, I would assume that an Oboe sound should come
closest. (Just like, for most MIDI patch sets, the distance between
their "Clarinet" sound and any real clarinet, be it in b-flat, a or even
c, is probably much larger than the difference between those instruments
in real life.)

Someone interested in obtaining realistic sounds would probably a) not
use LilyPond as a MIDI generator anyway, and b) use a dedicated
collection of sampled instruments where it does not matter much which
MIDI instrument number is used, as long as the right patch set is going
to be connected.

Lukas


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Re: MIDI instrument for oboe d'amore

Aaron Hill
In reply to this post by Jacques Menu Muzhic
On 2019-04-29 9:28 am, Jacques Menu wrote:
> Hello,
>
> I find oboe and french horn, but no oboe d’amore in A.6 MIDI
> instruments.
> Which other setting can I use for this instrument in A?

General MIDI does not define such an instrument in the standard, and
neither did GS nor XG.  In fact, the reed section of GM Level 2 has no
extended patches at all.  (GS and XG do have variations like the "bass
clarinet" and some alternate saxophone patches.)

While it would not be standards-compliant, you could certainly select an
alternate bank for the oboe patch with the intention that it means an
oboe d'amore.  For your own usage, it would require you to manually
configure your synth to load a suitable sound for the instrument.  For
other folks using your MIDI file, their synths should fall back using a
standard oboe patch which might work, except for lower notes that could
be outside the playable range.

 From what I understand, an oboe d'amore has a timbre between the normal
oboe and the cor anglais.  What I would do in my virtual instrument
software is load up an oboe patch but then apply some EQ to soften the
sound a bit so it is not quite as assertive.  For the fact that the
playable range is lower, I might also need to mix in a little of the
English horn patch to fill out the lower notes, which will require
blending to balance the timbre.  But it must be noted that this work is
beyond the scope of MIDI.

> There’s no clarinet in A either.

For better or worse, a "clarinet in A" is simply a clarinet as far as
General MIDI is concerned.  In MIDI you typically specify the pitch you
want played, not the note that is written that may sound higher or lower
depending on the instrument.  As such, MIDI note 60 would most often
refer to the equal-tempered middle C whose fundamental is approximately
261.63 Hz, and one should expect that any GM-compliant synth to render
the pitch properly.  That said, I have encountered some sound libraries
that intentionally transpose samples from their nominal pitches; and
that requires manually transposing a MIDI track to compensate.  I
dislike this practice as it is not very portable.


-- Aaron Hill

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Re: MIDI instrument for oboe d'amore

Jacques Menu Muzhic
Thanks Lukas and Aaron for your help.

In fact, my use case is merely to listen to the MIDI file from within Frescobaldi, to ear-proof the score. I don’t have any MIDI equipment, and organ sound is fine for that purpose.

I got the surprise that transposing a voice for the oboe d’amore in A, in Lully’s « Dormez beaux yeux » for the needs of our oboes band, lead to quite modern music being heard...

What would best suit my need is a way to counter-balance the effect of \transpose in the \midi block. This way, one would get both the printed score and the MIDI pitches alright, even for instruments unknown to standard MIDI.

Can that be done?

JM

> Le 29 avr. 2019 à 20:53, Aaron Hill <[hidden email]> a écrit :
>
> On 2019-04-29 9:28 am, Jacques Menu wrote:
>> Hello,
>> I find oboe and french horn, but no oboe d’amore in A.6 MIDI instruments.
>> Which other setting can I use for this instrument in A?
>
> General MIDI does not define such an instrument in the standard, and neither did GS nor XG.  In fact, the reed section of GM Level 2 has no extended patches at all.  (GS and XG do have variations like the "bass clarinet" and some alternate saxophone patches.)
>
> While it would not be standards-compliant, you could certainly select an alternate bank for the oboe patch with the intention that it means an oboe d'amore.  For your own usage, it would require you to manually configure your synth to load a suitable sound for the instrument.  For other folks using your MIDI file, their synths should fall back using a standard oboe patch which might work, except for lower notes that could be outside the playable range.
>
> From what I understand, an oboe d'amore has a timbre between the normal oboe and the cor anglais.  What I would do in my virtual instrument software is load up an oboe patch but then apply some EQ to soften the sound a bit so it is not quite as assertive.  For the fact that the playable range is lower, I might also need to mix in a little of the English horn patch to fill out the lower notes, which will require blending to balance the timbre.  But it must be noted that this work is beyond the scope of MIDI.
>
>> There’s no clarinet in A either.
>
> For better or worse, a "clarinet in A" is simply a clarinet as far as General MIDI is concerned.  In MIDI you typically specify the pitch you want played, not the note that is written that may sound higher or lower depending on the instrument.  As such, MIDI note 60 would most often refer to the equal-tempered middle C whose fundamental is approximately 261.63 Hz, and one should expect that any GM-compliant synth to render the pitch properly.  That said, I have encountered some sound libraries that intentionally transpose samples from their nominal pitches; and that requires manually transposing a MIDI track to compensate.  I dislike this practice as it is not very portable.
>
>
> -- Aaron Hill
>
> _______________________________________________
> lilypond-user mailing list
> [hidden email]
> https://lists.gnu.org/mailman/listinfo/lilypond-user


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Re: MIDI instrument for oboe d'amore

Jan-Peter Voigt
Hi Aaron,

just a question: Did you set "\transposition a"?
(http://lilypond.org/doc/v2.19/Documentation/notation/displaying-pitches.html#instrument-transpositions)

HTH
Jan-Peter

Am 30.04.19 um 09:33 schrieb Jacques Menu:

> Thanks Lukas and Aaron for your help.
>
> In fact, my use case is merely to listen to the MIDI file from within Frescobaldi, to ear-proof the score. I don’t have any MIDI equipment, and organ sound is fine for that purpose.
>
> I got the surprise that transposing a voice for the oboe d’amore in A, in Lully’s « Dormez beaux yeux » for the needs of our oboes band, lead to quite modern music being heard...
>
> What would best suit my need is a way to counter-balance the effect of \transpose in the \midi block. This way, one would get both the printed score and the MIDI pitches alright, even for instruments unknown to standard MIDI.
>
> Can that be done?
>
> JM
>
>> Le 29 avr. 2019 à 20:53, Aaron Hill <[hidden email]> a écrit :
>>
>> On 2019-04-29 9:28 am, Jacques Menu wrote:
>>> Hello,
>>> I find oboe and french horn, but no oboe d’amore in A.6 MIDI instruments.
>>> Which other setting can I use for this instrument in A?
>>
>> General MIDI does not define such an instrument in the standard, and neither did GS nor XG.  In fact, the reed section of GM Level 2 has no extended patches at all.  (GS and XG do have variations like the "bass clarinet" and some alternate saxophone patches.)
>>
>> While it would not be standards-compliant, you could certainly select an alternate bank for the oboe patch with the intention that it means an oboe d'amore.  For your own usage, it would require you to manually configure your synth to load a suitable sound for the instrument.  For other folks using your MIDI file, their synths should fall back using a standard oboe patch which might work, except for lower notes that could be outside the playable range.
>>
>> From what I understand, an oboe d'amore has a timbre between the normal oboe and the cor anglais.  What I would do in my virtual instrument software is load up an oboe patch but then apply some EQ to soften the sound a bit so it is not quite as assertive.  For the fact that the playable range is lower, I might also need to mix in a little of the English horn patch to fill out the lower notes, which will require blending to balance the timbre.  But it must be noted that this work is beyond the scope of MIDI.
>>
>>> There’s no clarinet in A either.
>>
>> For better or worse, a "clarinet in A" is simply a clarinet as far as General MIDI is concerned.  In MIDI you typically specify the pitch you want played, not the note that is written that may sound higher or lower depending on the instrument.  As such, MIDI note 60 would most often refer to the equal-tempered middle C whose fundamental is approximately 261.63 Hz, and one should expect that any GM-compliant synth to render the pitch properly.  That said, I have encountered some sound libraries that intentionally transpose samples from their nominal pitches; and that requires manually transposing a MIDI track to compensate.  I dislike this practice as it is not very portable.
>>
>>
>> -- Aaron Hill
>>
>> _______________________________________________
>> lilypond-user mailing list
>> [hidden email]
>> https://lists.gnu.org/mailman/listinfo/lilypond-user
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> lilypond-user mailing list
> [hidden email]
> https://lists.gnu.org/mailman/listinfo/lilypond-user
>


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Re: MIDI instrument for oboe d'amore

David Kastrup
In reply to this post by Jacques Menu Muzhic
Jacques Menu <[hidden email]> writes:

> Thanks Lukas and Aaron for your help.
>
> In fact, my use case is merely to listen to the MIDI file from within
> Frescobaldi, to ear-proof the score. I don’t have any MIDI equipment,
> and organ sound is fine for that purpose.
>
> I got the surprise that transposing a voice for the oboe d’amore in A,
> in Lully’s « Dormez beaux yeux » for the needs of our oboes band, lead
> to quite modern music being heard...
>
> What would best suit my need is a way to counter-balance the effect of
> \transpose in the \midi block. This way, one would get both the
> printed score and the MIDI pitches alright, even for instruments
> unknown to standard MIDI.
>
> Can that be done?

That's what \transposition is for.  Look it up in the manual.

--
David Kastrup

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Re: MIDI instrument for oboe d'amore

David Kastrup
David Kastrup <[hidden email]> writes:

> Jacques Menu <[hidden email]> writes:
>
>> Thanks Lukas and Aaron for your help.
>>
>> In fact, my use case is merely to listen to the MIDI file from within
>> Frescobaldi, to ear-proof the score. I don’t have any MIDI equipment,
>> and organ sound is fine for that purpose.
>>
>> I got the surprise that transposing a voice for the oboe d’amore in A,
>> in Lully’s « Dormez beaux yeux » for the needs of our oboes band, lead
>> to quite modern music being heard...
>>
>> What would best suit my need is a way to counter-balance the effect of
>> \transpose in the \midi block. This way, one would get both the
>> printed score and the MIDI pitches alright, even for instruments
>> unknown to standard MIDI.
>>
>> Can that be done?
>
> That's what \transposition is for.  Look it up in the manual.

Note: as opposed to \transpose (completely different thing in both
semantics and syntax though looking rather similar).

--
David Kastrup

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Re: MIDI instrument for oboe d'amore

Jacques Menu Muzhic
Unfortunately, \transposition can only be used when the notes are written in « instrument » pitch, not concert pitch. BTW, it could be better named as something like \transposingInstrument, it seems.

I started by writing the code to obtain the same score as the manuscript I’m using, where the first staff is written for a viola, hence my notes are in concert pitch.

Then I added \transpose to have it printed for an oboe d’amore.
But then I can no longer proof it by ear without changing the MIDI output too, which I don’t know how to do.

I’d prefer to keep the notes unchanged, in concert pitch, instead of modifying them - hence my post.

JM

Le 30 avr. 2019 à 11:20, David Kastrup <[hidden email]> a écrit :

David Kastrup <[hidden email]> writes:

Jacques Menu <[hidden email]> writes:

Thanks Lukas and Aaron for your help.

In fact, my use case is merely to listen to the MIDI file from within
Frescobaldi, to ear-proof the score. I don’t have any MIDI equipment,
and organ sound is fine for that purpose.

I got the surprise that transposing a voice for the oboe d’amore in A,
in Lully’s « Dormez beaux yeux » for the needs of our oboes band, lead
to quite modern music being heard...

What would best suit my need is a way to counter-balance the effect of
\transpose in the \midi block. This way, one would get both the
printed score and the MIDI pitches alright, even for instruments
unknown to standard MIDI.

Can that be done?

That's what \transposition is for.  Look it up in the manual.

Note: as opposed to \transpose (completely different thing in both
semantics and syntax though looking rather similar).

--
David Kastrup


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Re: MIDI instrument for oboe d'amore

David Kastrup
In reply to this post by David Kastrup
Jacques Menu <[hidden email]> writes:

> Unfortunately, \transposition can only be used when the notes are written in «
> instrument » pitch, not concert pitch.

Says who?

> BTW, it could be better named as something like
> \transposingInstrument, it seems.

Why?

> I started by writing the code to obtain the same score as the
> manuscript shown below, where the first staff is written for a viola,
> hence my notes are in concert pitch.
>
> Then I added \transpose to have it printed for an oboe d'amore:
>
>
> But then I can no longer proof it by ear without changing the MIDI
> output too, which I don’t know how to do.

With \transposition .

> I’d prefer to keep the notes unchanged, in concert pitch, instead of
> modifying them - hence my post.

How about a minimal example exhibiting the problem?
<http://lilypond.org/tiny-examples.html>

--
David Kastrup

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Re: MIDI instrument for oboe d'amore

Lukas-Fabian Moser
In reply to this post by Jacques Menu Muzhic

Hi,

Am 01.05.19 um 09:55 schrieb Jacques Menu:
Unfortunately, \transposition can only be used when the notes are written in « instrument » pitch, not concert pitch. BTW, it could be better named as something like \transposingInstrument, it seems.

I started by writing the code to obtain the same score as the manuscript I’m using, where the first staff is written for a viola, hence my notes are in concert pitch.

Then I added \transpose to have it printed for an oboe d’amore.
But then I can no longer proof it by ear without changing the MIDI output too, which I don’t know how to do.

I’d prefer to keep the notes unchanged, in concert pitch, instead of modifying them - hence my post.

But \transposition and \transpose may be used together.

So, of course you may very well enter your Oboe d'amore part in concert pitch. Then \transpose lets you get the correct written pitch, and \transposition takes care of keeping the generated MIDI in check.

For example, try this:

\version "2.19.82"

oboe_d_amore_concertpitch = \relative c' {
  \key e \major
  e4. 8 8 8 dis e
  fis4 fis fis r
}

\score {
  \new Staff \transpose a c' { \transposition a \oboe_d_amore_concertpitch }
  \layout {} \midi {}
}

Lukas


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Re: MIDI instrument for oboe d'amore

Jacques Menu Muzhic
In reply to this post by David Kastrup


Le 1 mai 2019 à 10:01, David Kastrup <[hidden email]> a écrit :

Jacques Menu <[hidden email]> writes:

Unfortunately, \transposition can only be used when the notes are written in «
instrument » pitch, not concert pitch.

Says who?

The LPNR:

The pitch to use for \transposition should correspond to the real sound heard when a c' written on the staff is played by the transposing instrument. This pitch is entered in absolute mode, so an instrument that produces a real sound which is one tone higher than the printed music should use \transposition d'.  \transposition should only be used if the pitches are not being entered in concert pitch.

BTW, it could be better named as something like
\transposingInstrument, it seems.

Why?

Would be more explicit: transposition can be understood as the act of transposing, whereas \transpose exists too.

I started by writing the code to obtain the same score as the
manuscript shown below, where the first staff is written for a viola,
hence my notes are in concert pitch.

Then I added \transpose to have it printed for an oboe d'amore:


But then I can no longer proof it by ear without changing the MIDI
output too, which I don’t know how to do.

With \transposition .

I did various attempts at that, but was unsuccessful.

I’d prefer to keep the notes unchanged, in concert pitch, instead of
modifying them - hence my post.

How about a minimal example exhibiting the problem?

I extracted the first two measures so that the phenomenon is clear, sorry if that’s a bit long.

Comment the line :

          \transpose a c' % <<<<<<========= HERE

to hear the music as it I need it to sound.

JM


%%%%%%%%%%%%%

\version "2.19.82"

Part_POne_Staff_One_Voice_One = \relative {
  \partial 2
  \key bes \major
  \numericTimeSignature \time 3/2
  g'2 | % 1
  g1 g2 | % 2
}

Part_PTwo_Staff_One_Voice_One = \relative {
  \partial 2
  \key bes \major
  \numericTimeSignature \time 3/2
  \clef "bass"
  ees'2 | % 1
  d1 ees2 | % 2
}

Part_PThree_Staff_One_Voice_One = \relative {
  \partial 2
  \key bes \major
  \numericTimeSignature \time 3/2
  \clef "bass"
  c'2 | % 1
  b!1 c2 | % 2
}

\score {
  <<

    \new StaffGroup <<

      \new Staff = "Part_POne_Staff_One"
      \with {
        instrumentName = "Hautbois d'amour"
      }
      <<
        \context Voice = "Part_POne_Staff_One_Voice_One" <<
          \transpose a c' % <<<<<<========= HERE
          \Part_POne_Staff_One_Voice_One
        >>
      >>
      \new Staff = "Part_PTwo_Staff_One"
      \with {
        instrumentName = "Basson 1"
      }
      <<
        \context Voice = "Part_PTwo_Staff_One_Voice_One" <<
          \Part_PTwo_Staff_One_Voice_One
        >>
      >>

      \new Staff = "Part_PThree_Staff_One"
      \with {
        instrumentName = "Basson 2"
      }
      <<
        \context Voice = "Part_PThree_Staff_One_Voice_One" <<
          \Part_PThree_Staff_One_Voice_One
        >>
      >>

    >>

  >>

  \layout { }

  \midi {
    \tempo 2 = 90
  }
}

%%%%%%%%%%%%%


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Re: MIDI instrument for oboe d'amore

Lukas-Fabian Moser

The LPNR:

The pitch to use for \transposition should correspond to the real sound heard when a c' written on the staff is played by the transposing instrument. This pitch is entered in absolute mode, so an instrument that produces a real sound which is one tone higher than the printed music should use \transposition d'.  \transposition should only be used if the pitches are not being entered in concert pitch.

Well, yeah, that _might_ be seen as a little misleading. Certainly, that statement is supposed to say: It does not make sense to use \transposition for concert-pitch music.

But using \transpose a c' \some_concert_pitch_music_for_oboe_damore in effect creates music _not_ in concert pitch, for which then \transposition can (and should) be used, like in the example I gave earlier.

Lukas



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Re: MIDI instrument for oboe d'amore

David Kastrup
In reply to this post by Jacques Menu Muzhic
Jacques Menu <[hidden email]> writes:

>> Le 1 mai 2019 à 10:01, David Kastrup <[hidden email]> a écrit :
>>
>> Jacques Menu <[hidden email]> writes:
>>
>>> Unfortunately, \transposition can only be used when the notes are written in «
>>> instrument » pitch, not concert pitch.
>>
>> Says who?
>
> The LPNR:
>
> The pitch to use for \transposition should correspond to the real
> sound heard when a c' written on the staff is played by the
> transposing instrument. This pitch is entered in absolute mode, so an
> instrument that produces a real sound which is one tone higher than
> the printed music should use \transposition d'.  \transposition should
> only be used if the pitches are not being entered in concert pitch.

After using \transpose, they are not in concert pitch.

>> BTW, it could be better named as something like
>>> \transposingInstrument, it seems.
>>
>> Why?
>
> Would be more explicit: transposition can be understood as the act of
> transposing,

"transposition" is not a verb.  And it describes the relation between
printed pitch and Midi pitch without necessarily referring to an
instrument.

> whereas \transpose exists too.
>
>> I started by writing the code to obtain the same score as the
>>> manuscript shown below, where the first staff is written for a viola,
>>> hence my notes are in concert pitch.
>>>
>>> Then I added \transpose to have it printed for an oboe d'amore:
>>>
>>>
>>> But then I can no longer proof it by ear without changing the MIDI
>>> output too, which I don’t know how to do.
>>
>> With \transposition .
>
> I did various attempts at that, but was unsuccessful.
>
>> I’d prefer to keep the notes unchanged, in concert pitch, instead of
>>> modifying them - hence my post.
>>
>> How about a minimal example exhibiting the problem?
>
> I extracted the first two measures so that the phenomenon is clear, sorry if that’s a bit long.
>
> Comment the line :
>
>           \transpose a c' % <<<<<<========= HERE
>
> to hear the music as it I need it to sound.
>
> JM
>
>
> %%%%%%%%%%%%%
>
> \version "2.19.82"
>
> Part_POne_Staff_One_Voice_One = \relative {
>   \partial 2
>   \key bes \major
>   \numericTimeSignature \time 3/2
>   g'2 | % 1
>   g1 g2 | % 2
> }
>
> Part_PTwo_Staff_One_Voice_One = \relative {
>   \partial 2
>   \key bes \major
>   \numericTimeSignature \time 3/2
>   \clef "bass"
>   ees'2 | % 1
>   d1 ees2 | % 2
> }
>
> Part_PThree_Staff_One_Voice_One = \relative {
>   \partial 2
>   \key bes \major
>   \numericTimeSignature \time 3/2
>   \clef "bass"
>   c'2 | % 1
>   b!1 c2 | % 2
> }
>
> \score {
>   <<
>
>     \new StaffGroup <<
>
>       \new Staff = "Part_POne_Staff_One"
>       \with {
>         instrumentName = "Hautbois d'amour"
>       }
>       <<
>         \context Voice = "Part_POne_Staff_One_Voice_One" <<
>           \transpose a c' % <<<<<<========= HERE
>           \Part_POne_Staff_One_Voice_One
>         >>
>       >>
>       \new Staff = "Part_PTwo_Staff_One"
>       \with {
>         instrumentName = "Basson 1"
>       }
>       <<
>         \context Voice = "Part_PTwo_Staff_One_Voice_One" <<
>           \Part_PTwo_Staff_One_Voice_One
>         >>
>       >>
>
>       \new Staff = "Part_PThree_Staff_One"
>       \with {
>         instrumentName = "Basson 2"
>       }
>       <<
>         \context Voice = "Part_PThree_Staff_One_Voice_One" <<
>           \Part_PThree_Staff_One_Voice_One
>         >>
>       >>
>
>     >>
>
>   >>
>
>   \layout { }
>
>   \midi {
>     \tempo 2 = 90
>   }
> }
>
> %%%%%%%%%%%%%
>

I hear nothing wrong with

\version "2.19.82"

Part_POne_Staff_One_Voice_One = \relative {
  \partial 2
  \key bes \major
  \numericTimeSignature \time 3/2
  g'2 | % 1
  g1 g2 | % 2
}

Part_PTwo_Staff_One_Voice_One = \relative {
  \partial 2
  \key bes \major
  \numericTimeSignature \time 3/2
  \clef "bass"
  ees'2 | % 1
  d1 ees2 | % 2
}

Part_PThree_Staff_One_Voice_One = \relative {
  \partial 2
  \key bes \major
  \numericTimeSignature \time 3/2
  \clef "bass"
  c'2 | % 1
  b!1 c2 | % 2
}

\score {
  <<

    \new StaffGroup <<

      \new Staff = "Part_POne_Staff_One"
      \with {
        instrumentName = "Hautbois d'amour"
      }
      <<
        \context Voice = "Part_POne_Staff_One_Voice_One" <<
          \transposition a
          \transpose a c' % <<<<<<========= HERE
          \Part_POne_Staff_One_Voice_One
        >>
      >>
      \new Staff = "Part_PTwo_Staff_One"
      \with {
        instrumentName = "Basson 1"
      }
      <<
        \context Voice = "Part_PTwo_Staff_One_Voice_One" <<
          \Part_PTwo_Staff_One_Voice_One
        >>
      >>

      \new Staff = "Part_PThree_Staff_One"
      \with {
        instrumentName = "Basson 2"
      }
      <<
        \context Voice = "Part_PThree_Staff_One_Voice_One" <<
          \Part_PThree_Staff_One_Voice_One
        >>
      >>

    >>

  >>

  \layout { }

  \midi {
    \tempo 2 = 90
  }
}

%%%%%%%%%%%%%


--
David Kastrup

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Re: MIDI instrument for oboe d'amore

Jacques Menu Muzhic

The pitch to use for \transposition should correspond to the real
sound heard when a c' written on the staff is played by the
transposing instrument. This pitch is entered in absolute mode, so an
instrument that produces a real sound which is one tone higher than
the printed music should use \transposition d'.  \transposition should
only be used if the pitches are not being entered in concert pitch.

After using \transpose, they are not in concert pitch.

BTW, it could be better named as something like
\transposingInstrument, it seems.

Why?

Would be more explicit: transposition can be understood as the act of
transposing,

"transposition" is not a verb.  And it describes the relation between
printed pitch and Midi pitch without necessarily referring to an
instrument.

That wasn’t clear to me from the doc.

       \context Voice = "Part_POne_Staff_One_Voice_One" <<
  \transposition a
         \transpose a c' % <<<<<<========= HERE
         \Part_POne_Staff_One_Voice_One

Thanks David, that solves my problem!

JM


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