Braille scores

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Braille scores

Jacques Menu Muzhic
Hello folks,

I read in the recent Export to MusicXML thread about braille scores.

Sorry if this is offtrack : I didn’t find on the Internet how such scores are structured (the details of notes and the like is there alright) and what font(s) should be used to display them.

Accessing non confidential examples would be a great help too I guess.

Thanks if you can help!

JM


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Re: Braille scores

Hwaen Ch'uqi
Greetings Jacques,

Could you further clarify your questions? Are you asking how Braille
music is generally structured on the physical page? And what is meant
by a non confidential example?

Hwaen Ch'uqi


On 10/17/18, Jacques Menu <[hidden email]> wrote:

> Hello folks,
>
> I read in the recent Export to MusicXML thread about braille scores.
>
> Sorry if this is offtrack : I didn’t find on the Internet how such scores
> are structured (the details of notes and the like is there alright) and what
> font(s) should be used to display them.
>
> Accessing non confidential examples would be a great help too I guess.
>
> Thanks if you can help!
>
> JM
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> lilypond-user mailing list
> [hidden email]
> https://lists.gnu.org/mailman/listinfo/lilypond-user
>

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Re: Braille scores

Aaron Hill
In reply to this post by Jacques Menu Muzhic
On 2018-10-16 11:38 pm, Jacques Menu wrote:
> Hello folks,
>
> I read in the recent Export to MusicXML thread about braille scores.
>
> Sorry if this is offtrack : I didn’t find on the Internet how such
> scores are structured (the details of notes and the like is there
> alright) and what font(s) should be used to display them.

Wikipedia has a pretty informative article:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Braille_music

There are a number of links provided to additional resources, such as:
http://www.brailleauthority.org/music/Music_Braille_Code_2015.pdf

This related project has the Goldberg Variations as examples:
bmc.blind.guru/


-- Aaron Hill

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Re: Braille scores

Jacques Menu Muzhic
Hello Hwaen and Aaron,

Thanks Aaron for the very useful link at www.brailleauthority.org.
What I meant by non confidential examples is exactly that, small scores with full Braille Music code and the corresponding western, graphical scores.

IIUC the original post about MusicXML export, translating MusicXML to Braille would be welcomed by blind musicians. Is that so?

Last questions : in a programming language a C or Python, what should one write as character strings to obtain the code for example Example 1.8.1-1, and what font or tool should one use to get it displayed as shown in the PDF doc?

Thanks!

JM

> Le 17 oct. 2018 à 16:00, Aaron Hill <[hidden email]> a écrit :
>
> On 2018-10-16 11:38 pm, Jacques Menu wrote:
>> Hello folks,
>> I read in the recent Export to MusicXML thread about braille scores.
>> Sorry if this is offtrack : I didn’t find on the Internet how such
>> scores are structured (the details of notes and the like is there
>> alright) and what font(s) should be used to display them.
>
> Wikipedia has a pretty informative article:
> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Braille_music
>
> There are a number of links provided to additional resources, such as:
> http://www.brailleauthority.org/music/Music_Braille_Code_2015.pdf
>
> This related project has the Goldberg Variations as examples:
> bmc.blind.guru/
>
>
> -- Aaron Hill
>
> _______________________________________________
> lilypond-user mailing list
> [hidden email]
> https://lists.gnu.org/mailman/listinfo/lilypond-user


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Re: Braille scores

David Wright
On Wed 17 Oct 2018 at 20:35:22 (+0200), Jacques Menu wrote:
> Hello Hwaen and Aaron,
>
> Thanks Aaron for the very useful link at www.brailleauthority.org.
> What I meant by non confidential examples is exactly that, small scores with full Braille Music code and the corresponding western, graphical scores.
>
> IIUC the original post about MusicXML export, translating MusicXML to Braille would be welcomed by blind musicians. Is that so?
>
> Last questions : in a programming language a C or Python, what should one write as character strings to obtain the code for example Example 1.8.1-1, and what font or tool should one use to get it displayed as shown in the PDF doc?

Braille is in Unicode. Would something like
http://www.ltg.ed.ac.uk/~richard/utf-8.cgi?input=283c&mode=hex
be an appropriate code for the first character?

Cheers,
David.

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Re: Braille scores

Aaron Hill
In reply to this post by Jacques Menu Muzhic
On 2018-10-17 11:35 am, Jacques Menu wrote:
> Last questions : in a programming language a C or Python, what should
> one write as character strings to obtain the code for example Example
> 1.8.1-1, and what font or tool should one use to get it displayed as
> shown in the PDF doc?

Braille can be easily represented as a 6-bit or 8-bit value, depending
on whether you need the fourth row.  Unicode supports Braille and has
allocated code points 2800-28FF for this purpose.  This follows the
scheme where each dot corresponds to a particular bit in the byte, where
dot "1" (upper-left) is the least significant, and dot "8" (lower-right)
the most significant.  This means the basic three-row Braille are mapped
to 2800-283F.

Ideally, a font will support the Unicode standard so the code points
will render appropriately, but some fonts may have been created before
the code points were allocated.  In these cases, there can be some
variation in the mapping scheme.  Braille symbols may be mapped to
numerals and digits in a natural fashion rather than in the Unicode
binary scheme.  This may be easier for end-users, but it presents a
challenge for computers.  You are best off using a look-up table in that
case.

Most fonts that I have found online only show a visual indicator for the
raised dots.  However, you can find a few fonts that include outlines as
well.  But Braille should be easy enough to render manually without
needing a font.  Just make sure to do the research on the correct sizing
and spacing.

-- Aaron Hill

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Re: Braille scores

Jacques Menu Muzhic
Thanks Aaron, that makes things clear.

A nice day!

JM

> Le 17 oct. 2018 à 21:58, Aaron Hill <[hidden email]> a écrit :
>
> On 2018-10-17 11:35 am, Jacques Menu wrote:
>> Last questions : in a programming language a C or Python, what should
>> one write as character strings to obtain the code for example Example
>> 1.8.1-1, and what font or tool should one use to get it displayed as
>> shown in the PDF doc?
>
> Braille can be easily represented as a 6-bit or 8-bit value, depending on whether you need the fourth row.  Unicode supports Braille and has allocated code points 2800-28FF for this purpose.  This follows the scheme where each dot corresponds to a particular bit in the byte, where dot "1" (upper-left) is the least significant, and dot "8" (lower-right) the most significant.  This means the basic three-row Braille are mapped to 2800-283F.
>
> Ideally, a font will support the Unicode standard so the code points will render appropriately, but some fonts may have been created before the code points were allocated.  In these cases, there can be some variation in the mapping scheme.  Braille symbols may be mapped to numerals and digits in a natural fashion rather than in the Unicode binary scheme.  This may be easier for end-users, but it presents a challenge for computers.  You are best off using a look-up table in that case.
>
> Most fonts that I have found online only show a visual indicator for the raised dots.  However, you can find a few fonts that include outlines as well.  But Braille should be easy enough to render manually without needing a font.  Just make sure to do the research on the correct sizing and spacing.
>
> -- Aaron Hill
>
> _______________________________________________
> lilypond-user mailing list
> [hidden email]
> https://lists.gnu.org/mailman/listinfo/lilypond-user


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